Strength & Conditioning
Gymnastics Warm Up
8 minutes, alternating:
Ring Rows
Hollow Holds

High Bar Back Squat: 4X5 (+2.5Kg heavier than last time)

Conditioning
Every Minute for 5 Minutes:
3 Strict/Banded Pull Ups + 25 Single Skips
-rest 1 minute-
4 rounds of:

30 sec. Max Box Steps
30 sec. Max Effort Kettlebell Swings (Heavy)
30 sec. Max Box Steps
90 sec. Rest


photo (42)

CrossFit
Gymnastics Warm Up
8 minutes, alternating:
Ring Rows
Hollow Holds

Strength

High Bar Back Squat: 4X5@85% – quick up and down with no pause every set, rest 90 sec.

Conditioning
With a continuously running clock:
1) EMOM for 5 minutes:

4/2 Muscle-Ups followed by – 1 ME UB set of Double-Unders (if miss occurs before 10 reps behind DU again)
If you don’t have a Muscle Up do strict pull ups.

*Rest 1 Minute. When the clock hits 6:00 begin

2) 4 rounds of:

30 sec. Max Effort Burpees
30 sec. Max Effort Power Cleans 75Kg/50Kg
30 sec. Max Effort Burpees
90 sec. Rest

Good Days & Bad Days – James

So you’ve had a bad day, we’ve all been had them. Everything that could have went wrong did. You slept through your alarm clock, you got stuck in traffic, you missed the bus, you were late for work, you missed an important meeting, you got in trouble with your boss, the list goes on.

By now you’ve realised this also happens in training, you have your good workouts, you also have your bad workouts.

How you deal with these bad workouts is important, as it is very easy to beat yourself up and become disappointed in your performances. This can be particularly negative if you are using CrossFit as a stress buster. You don’t want it to become a source of stress.

Here are some ideas I find helpful when dealing with bad days in the gym and in life.

Look for the positives. The bright spots. What went well for you in the workout? Maybe your lifting felt good, heavy squats were feeling like warm up sets, but then you tanked in the met-con and felt like you were running on empty. Should you walk away dejected and feel bad because you didn’t do as well as you would have liked in the met-con? A lot of people would. Heck, I’ll be the first to admit that I’ve done that a number of times.

Instead try look for the positive part(s) of the session, the squats in our example, and celebrate the good. This is a lot more productive than dwelling on the bad stuff.

Worst case, if you can’t find any positives, at least your training and moving. Doing something is often better than doing nothing, or worse yet not being able to do anything at all. Be thankful for your body and the amazing things it can do.

Another way of looking at bad workouts is to think of them as merely a frame of reference for good ones. We all know how fantastic it feels to hit a PR, lift heavier or finish a workout faster than you did before. It’s a great feeling and it’s part of what keeps you coming back again and again.

We also know how it feels to miss a max lift or not do as well as you would have liked in a workout. Attempt to think of these bad workouts as a frame of reference for the good. Remind yourself that if they were all good workouts there would be no challenge. Without a bad workout you wouldn’t know a what a good workout was… everyday would be the same. Bad workouts do serve a purpose. To remind you of how great those good ones are.

No one is perfect, forget the idea that everything needs to be perfect. it won’t happen. We live in an imperfect world and it is impossible to control everything. Sometimes your best laid plans come apart at the seams. The same is true when it comes to training, this is a journey, an experiment in fitness. Some things will go right, some will go wrong, some will go horribly wrong. You’ll have some good workout and some bad and maybe some really really bad ones. When you have a bad day the important thing is that you remain positive. Simply pick yourself up, dust yourself off and try again. Tomorrow is another training day, unless of course it’s a rest day! :)